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How to Backup your computer online for free

Welcome to the Pittsburgh Tech Guy!  Your local source for good, dependable technical support and information!  Keep up with the latest Tech news here!

Remember, all home computer analysis are free!

Sunday
Aug042019

If you need a great massage!! Greentree Sportsplex

30 Years of experience, affordable and an experience you will not forget!

Monday
Jul222019

10 best free movie streaming services: Netflix alternatives for 2019

Is Netflix putting a strain on your budget? Following a price hike earlier this year, the streaming service now starts at $9 per month, with its most popular plan now at $13 and its ultra-HD tier priced at $16.

Fear not: As long as you have an internet connection, you can continue to enjoy movie night. Granted, you may not be able to stream Hollywood's latest, but you can still watch gems such as Blade Runner, Captain Fantastic, Eighth Grade and plenty of classics, all without spending an extra penny.

Here are 10 services offering totally free, totally legal movies you can watch online. Some offer TV shows as well. Just be prepared to sit through commercials, because that's how most of these services pay the bills. And note that because selections change regularly, not all the titles listed here may still be available.

 

Click here for the full article

Monday
Jul222019

YouTube TV review: It's a cable replacement, but it's not for budget hunters anymore

We're four years into the existence of live TV streaming as an option for cable TV cord cutters, and it feels like we're entering the awkward teen phase. While the technology is generally more stable now than ever, the pricing model is still working itself out. Most services are constantly ratcheting up their prices, including YouTube TV's recent jump from $40 to $50 per month.

YouTube TV is definitely one of the best live TV streaming experiences you can buy. The interface is easy to use, slick and fast on a variety of devices, and supports up to six separate family member profiles. Its cloud DVR is the best in the business, with unlimited storage and pretty much all the capabilities of a hardware DVR like TiVo. And its channel selection is top-notch, including numerous cable stables and coverage of all four local networks (ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC) in most markets nationwide (note that CBS is the parent company of CNET and Showtime). 

The catch? Given the $50 price tag, it may not actually save you much money over cable TV. Let's dive in.

 

Click here for the Article in full.

Sunday
Jul212019

Adware Is the Malware You Should Actually Worry About

When you think of malware, it's understandable if your mind first goes to elite hackers launching sophisticated dragnets. But unless you're being targeted by a nation-state or advanced crime syndicate, you're unlikely to encounter these ultra-technical threats yourself. Run-of-the-mill profit-generating malware, on the other hand, is rampant. And the type you're most likely to encounter is adware.

In your daily life you probably don't think much about adware, software that illicitly sneaks ads into your apps and browsers as a way of generating bogus revenue. Remember pop-up ads? It's like that, but with special software running on your device, instead of rogue web scripts, throwing up the ads. Advertisers often pay out based on impressions, or the number of people who load their ads. So scammers have realized that the more ads they can foist upon you, the more money they pocket.

 

Click here for the rest of the fascinating article from Wired.com

Sunday
Jul212019

What to do if your laptop freezes

It feels like your computer only freezes in the middle of the most important tasks, doesn't it? If your computer has slowed to a near-crawl—or become unresponsive entirely—here's how to recover from the problem, and prevent it from happening in the future.

Give It a Minute to Catch Up

If you're performing a particularly CPU-intensive task, sometimes things will hang for a moment, making you think your laptop is permanently frozen—even if it's not. If it seems like your computer has completely locked up, give it a few minutes to catch up and finish what it's doing.

You'd be surprised how many times this actually works, especially if it's a random occurrence (and not a chronic problem). Similarly, make sure your mouse is working properly—it could be that your mouse just got disconnected or ran out of batteries, which can give the illusion of your computer freezing (even if it's working just fine).

Click here for the rest of the article.

Sunday
Jul212019

Chrome to Stop Websites From Detecting Browser's Incognito Mode

Google is plugging a loophole in Chrome that can expose to websites whether you're browsing via Incognito Mode.

The decision is bad news for the top media publishers. Many of them use "metered paywalls" to compel incoming visitors to buy a subscription. First you'll be given four or five articles you can read for free each month; then you'll be blocked from accessing anymore unless you pay up.

To circumvent the paywalls, one trick has been to use Chrome's Incognito Mode, which can temporarily reset a browser's internet cookies. The effect can fool a news website into thinking you're an entirely new visitor, and give you access to another round of free articles to read.

However, some publishers have been fighting back by blocking article visits over Chrome's Incognito Mode. Their websites can detect this by examining the browser's "FileSystem" API, which will be disabled when in Incognito Mode.

On Thursday, Google said it plans on closing the API loophole in Chrome 76, which is scheduled to release on July 30. "We want you to be able to access the web privately, with the assurance that your choice to do so is private as well," the company said in a blog post defending the decision.

The tech giant acknowledged the change will affect news publishers with metered paywalls, at time when the media industry is struggling to stay financially afloat. "Our (Google) News teams support sites with meter strategies and recognize the goal of reducing meter circumvention, however any approach based on private browsing detection undermines the principles of Incognito Mode," Google said.

The media lobbying group, the News Media Alliance, is not happy about the upcoming change. "It's disappointing that Google is again unilaterally imposing its will on news publishers," said the group's president, David Chavern in a statement.

"Since incognito browsing circumvents soft paywalls, and therefore free-sampling opportunities, publishers may be forced to build hard paywalls that ultimately make it harder for readers to access news online," he added.

In its defense, Google said: "We remain open to exploring solutions that are consistent with user trust and private browsing principles."